How to Get Fortnite to Run Better on Mac

Fortnite is the perfect example of a game that has taken the world by storm across all platforms.

Whether you’re a Switch owner, an Xbox gamer, a Playstation player, a mobile gamer, a PC gamer… this game has become impossible to ignore.

And the same goes for Mac.

Fortnite is available for Mac owners to enjoy although Mac OS isn’t known as the best OS for gaming.

But in order to get the best performance out of Fortnite, you might want to tweak a few settings. And that’s where we come in.

Fortnite System Requirements

Fortnite is extremely high paced and that’s why it’s crucial that performance and graphical fidelity be up to par.

The minimum system requirements for this game are:

GPU: Intel HD 4000

CPU: Core i3 2.4 GHz

RAM: 4GB DDR3 or DDR4.

OS: Mac OS Sierra (or above)

These are relatively easy specs for most players to be live up to. So, even if you have a Macbook Air or another system that is not a ‘gaming machine’, you should have no problem.

But there is a big difference between being able to play a game and being able to enjoy the best performance.

If you are extremely competitive, then you want to be hitting that 60fps with no sudden drops.

Best Settings for Fortnite on Mac

The easier way to get more performance out of your game is to simply bump down the specs.

You can do this for anti-aliasing, textures, effects, post processing, view distance, resolution, and more.

Likewise, you can choose to set the overall ‘quality’ to low, and you can turn off the likes of

Don’t turn off Vsync though. If you have a compatible monitor, then this will sync the refresh rate of your game to the refresh rate of your screen. That actually results in better stability.

You can also leave the ‘Show FPS’ set to ‘on’. This way, you can see precisely what kind of performance you’re managing, and whether the tweaks you’re employing are actually working.

Keep in mind though, that turning some settings down or off will also have a negative impact on your performance potentially.

For instance, turning anti-aliasing off means that you are going to lose the nice smooth edges along polygons.

That’s fine if you have a high resolution, but can be a little ugly at lower settings.

What this also means though, is that it might be harder to distinguish an enemy in the distance, and that your reaction times might be hampered as a result.

This is also why you might want to think twice about turning the resolution all the way down, and why you should think hard about turning the view distance to near.

This can save significantly on performance, but at the cost of a little strategic advantage. Shadows can likewise be useful for seeing someone coming around a corner.